Sound Energy Healing with Tibetan Bowls

Spa | Written By, NOW! BALI |

Beyond the distant rumble of city life are sounds with greater meaning.  You would know it when you heard it – in Kathmandu and other Buddhist centres around the world, it’s a familiar sound, part of everyday worship.  The deep guttural echo of chanting monks, the ringing of bells, clashing of symbols, the deep bass of the big prayer drums all conspire to create a sense of peace and a perfect meditative state.

 

Text and Photo by Ayu Sekar

Beyond the distant rumble of city life are sounds with greater meaning.  You would know it when you heard it – in Kathmandu and other Buddhist centres around the world, it’s a familiar sound, part of everyday worship.  The deep guttural echo of chanting monks, the ringing of bells, clashing of symbols, the deep bass of the big prayer drums all conspire to create a sense of peace and a perfect meditative state.

The Tibetan singing bowls are a part of this greater picture, and have been used for centuries as meditation aids. They date back centuries to the days when skilled artisans fashioned the bowls from a blend of twelve metals.   Metallurgical analyses, done by London’s British Museum reveal that the  bowls are comprised of  12-metal alloys which  include silver, nickel, copper, zinc, antimony, tin, lead, cobalt, bismuth, arsenic, cadmium and iron.  These ancient secrets of the skilled artisans are now lost and the quality and resonance of a new bowl cannot compare with older ones, some of which date back five or six hundred years.

According to Tibetan oral history, the existence of singing bowls dates back to the time of the Sakyamuni Buddha (560-480 BC).  Later the tradition was brought from India to Tibet by the well loved and respected Guru Rinpoche, (Padma Sambava) in the 8th Century AD, who also brought Buddhist teachings to the country.

Many ancient hand-crafted  instruments produce a certain tone when struck.  This co-incides with the vibrational frequency of AUM or OM which also sounds similar to middle C, for those who know music.  This sound frequency is known as “the perfect note,” and is used as a meditation aid as brain waves synchronize to these vibrations. 

The bowls come in different tones, so that you can have a higher tone, relating to a higher chakra (or energy centre) and a lower deeper resonation that affects the lower chakras, as each responds to different tones. The soothing sounds can help to balance the left and right hemispheres of the brain and meditating on the resonating tones can bring a about a “tuning in” to the universal energies that lie within each of us.

A session or two with a Tibetan bowl practitioner, can lead to stress reduction, deeper relaxation, holistic healing and chakra balancing.  In fact, the resonating tones can help to produce a calmness in even the most chaotic of minds.  To achieve the full benefits, you need several sessions and a typical session will last an hour. Whilst lying down on a simple mat, fully clothed, bowls of different pitches are placed around the body, aligning with the head and the main chakras and gently the different sounds are introduced.

As well as the afore mentioned benefits many people have experienced improved memory, clarity, vitality and increased energy.  Some chemotherapy patients claim an easing of the ailments associated with their treatment.  After a few sessions accounts of ‘out of body’ experiences have also been reported, on top of the general sense of tranquility most people experience. 

 

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NOW! BALI

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Makan place
Sthala Ubud

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